Law and Disorder Radio – Maher Arar Case Update – Economic Crisis – Hosts: Dalia Hashad, Heidi Boghosian, Michael Steven Smith & Michael Ratner – Produced by Geoff Brady

Law and Disorder Radio

Updates:

Omar Khadr – First Military Commissions Trial To Go Forward

Ali al-Marri – Key case defining enemy combatant – update with Jonathan Hafetz

Salim Ahmed Hamdan Decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Update: Canadian Rendition Victim Maher Arar

Last month, in the Maher Arar case, the Federal Court of Appeals ruled a 2-1 majority refusing to hold US authorities accountable for complicity in torture abroad. As Law and Disorder listeners may remember, Maher Arar, a Canadian citizen, traveling back to Canada, was picked up at JFK airport in 2002, detained in solitary confinement for 2 weeks by the US government then deported to Syria where he was interrogated and tortured. Cases involving diplomatic assurances in North America.

Last year, a Canadian commission of inquiry cleared Arar of any links to terrorism and he was given a $10.5 million settlement. Since then, the United States refused to clear his name and now this majority decision rules that his constitutional claims can not be heard in federal court for two reasons. The first reason was based on national security, the second because Mr. Arar, a dual citizen of Canada and Syria, does not have constitutional, due process rights.

Guest – Maria LaHood, attorney with the Center For Constitutional Rights

 

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Deepening Economic Crisis: How Deep, Where Is It Headed, Who is Accountable?

To many, the recent economic downturn could be a rough patch to a full collapse as a financial crisis hits the nation’s markets; add in that the United States is nine months into a significant acceleration in expected energy and food price increases. The distressful interaction is known as a “scissors crisis” among economists. We’ll also discuss the economic sub-genres, such as Military Keynesianism, GWOT spending, and housing markets. This, while Californians made a run on Indymac Bank, the biggest bank crisis since 1984. Indymac was started by three former high level people from Countrywide.

Quote: “Even though Iraq is a bad idea, the value of the US military to this country is rising not falling.”

Guests – Rick Wolff, Professor of Economics at University of Massachusetts at Amherst Rick teaches at the Brecht Forum and the New School in New York City. (Read Rick’s article, Economic Blues in the Monthly Review)

Max Fraad Wolff, freelance researcher, strategist, and writer in the areas of international finance and macroeconomics. Max’s work can be seen at Huffington Post, The Asia Times, Prudent Bear, Seeking Alpha and many other outlets.